The poem an essay on man by alexander pope

The whole Universe one system of Society. Nothing made wholly for itself, nor yet wholly for another. The happiness of animals mutual.

The poem an essay on man by alexander pope

Let us since Life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die Expatiate 2 free o'er all this scene of Man; A mighty maze! Together let us beat this ample field, Try what the open, what the covert yield; The latent tracts 3the giddy heights explore Of all who blindly creep, or sightless soar; Eye Nature's walks, shoot Folly as it flies, And catch the Manners living as they rise; Laugh where we must, be candid where we can; But vindicate 4 the ways of God to Man.

Say first, of God above, or Man below, What can we reason, but from what we know? Of Man what see we, but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer?

Thro' worlds unnumber'd tho' the God be known, 'Tis ours to trace him only in our own. He, who thro' vast immensity can pierce, See worlds on worlds compose one universe, Observe how system into system runs, What other planets circle other suns, What vary'd being peoples ev'ry star, May tell why Heav'n has made us as we are.

But of this frame the bearings, and the ties, The strong connections, nice dependencies, Gradations just, has thy pervading soul Look'd thro'?

The poem an essay on man by alexander pope

Is the great chain, that draws all to agree, And drawn supports, upheld by God, or thee? First, if thou canst, the harder reason guess, Why form'd no weaker, blinder, and no less! Ask of thy mother earth, why oaks are made Taller or stronger than the weeds they shade?

An Essay On Man: Epistle Ii Poem by Alexander Pope - Poem Hunter

Respecting Man, whatever wrong we call, Nay, must be right, as relative to all. In human works, tho' labour'd on with pain, A thousand movements scarce one purpose gain; In God's, one single can its end produce; Yet serves to second too some other use.

So Man, who here seems principal alone, Perhaps acts second to some sphere unknown, Touches some wheel, or verges to some goal; 'Tis but a part we see, and not a whole. When the proud steed shall know why Man restrains His fiery course, or drives him o'er the plains; When the dull Ox, why now he breaks the clod, Is now a victim, and now Egypt's God: Then say not Man's imperfect, Heav'n in fault; Say rather, Man's as perfect as he ought; His knowledge measur'd to his state and place, His time a moment, and a point his space.

If to be perfect in a certain sphere, What matter, soon or late, or here or there? The blest today is as completely so, As who began a thousand years ago. Heav'n from all creatures hides the book of Fate, All but the page prescrib'd, their present state; From brutes what men, from men what spirits know: Or who could suffer Being here below?

The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, Had he thy Reason, would he skip and play?

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Pleas'd to the last, he crops the flow'ry food, And licks the hand just rais'd to shed his blood. Oh blindness to the future! Hope humbly then; with trembling pinions soar; Wait the great teacher Death, and God adore! What future bliss, he gives not thee to know, But gives that Hope to be thy blessing now.

Hope springs eternal in the human breast: Man never Is, but always To be blest: The soul, uneasy and confin'd from home, Rests and expatiates in a life to come. To Be, contents his natural desire, He asks no Angel's wing, no Seraph's 8 fire; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.

In Pride, in reas'ning Pride, our error lies; All quit their sphere, and rush into the skies. Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes, Men would be Angels, Angels would be Gods. Ask for what end the heav'nly bodies shine, Earth for whose use?

Pride answers, "Tis for mine: For me kind Nature wakes her genial pow'r, Suckles each herb, and spreads out ev'ry flow'r; Annual for me, the grape, the rose renew The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings; For me, health gushes from a thousand springs; Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise; My foot-stool earth, my canopy the skies.

If the great end be human Happiness, Then Nature deviates; and can Man do less? As much that end a constant course requires Of show'rs and sun-shine, as of Man's desires; As much eternal springs and cloudless skies, As Men for ever temp'rate, calm, and wise.

If plagues or earthquakes break not Heav'n's design, Why then a Borgia, 11 or a Catiline?

The poem an essay on man by alexander pope

From pride, from pride, our very reas'ning springs; Account for moral as for nat'ral things: Why charge we Heav'n in those, in these acquit?

In both, to reason right is to submit. Better for Us, perhaps, it might appear, Were there all harmony, all virtue here; That never air or ocean felt the wind; That never passion discompos'd the mind: What would this Man? Now upward will he soar, And little less than Angel, 15 would be more; Now looking downwards, just as griev'd appears To want the strength of bulls, the fur of bears.Pope published Essay on Man in , and the following year a scandal broke out when an apparently unauthorized and heavily sanitized edition of Pope's letters was released by the notoriously reprobate publisher Edmund Curll (collections of correspondence were rare during the period).

Unbeknownst to the public, Pope had edited his letters and delivered them to Curll in secret. The work that more than any other popularized the optimistic philosophy, not only in England but throughout Europe, was Alexander Pope's Essay on Man. Alexander Pope published An Essay on Man in An Essay on Man is a poem published by Alexander Pope in – [1] [2] [3] It is an effort to rationalize or rather "vindicate the ways of God to man" (l), a variation of John Milton 's claim in the opening lines of Paradise Lost, that he will "justify the ways of God to men" ().

Poem - Essay on Man by Alexander Pope. Read a poem - Certainly we all greatly enjoy beautiful poetry and reading poems is a very pleasant past time. Home. Cards. Greetings. Poems. Quotes. Calendar.

Search. Account. Polski. Essay on Man - Poems by. By Alexander Pope About this Poet The acknowledged master of the heroic couplet and one of the primary tastemakers of the Augustan age, Alexander Pope was a central figure in the Neoclassical movement of the early 18th century.

Poem - From an Essay on Man by Alexander Pope. Read a poem - Certainly we all greatly enjoy beautiful poetry and reading poems is a very pleasant past time.

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